Greens call for Sydney-Melbourne rail link
#1
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/...n=business

Greens call for Sydney-Melbourne rail link

The Greens have renewed their push for a high-speed rail link between Sydney and Melbourne.

They are calling on the Federal Government to fund a 12-month, $10-million study to work out the best route.

Greens Leader Bob Brown said a rail link would reduce transport emissions and congestion.

"It's a phenomenal way to travel. It's efficient, it's environmentally and it's socially very, very much desired," he said.

"We've got the fourth busiest air route between Sydney and Melbourne in the world.

"It's full of potential for high-speed rail and it needs the Government to be the instigator."

Senator Brown says he hopes a study would provide a blueprint for building the network as quickly and cheaply as possible.

And he says the link could be part of a wider rail network.

"Let's look at the Brisbane connection as well. Let's look at Newcastle and Canberra and how they might be facilitated by this exciting, alternative, land-based means of fast, rapid, clean, efficient transport," he said.
Graham R - Dalby Qld
Any opinions expressed here are my own and not those of any group or organisation I am associated with.
Member Southern Downs Steam Railway | ARHS Qld
#2
Let's not forget when all's said & done, the Greens are just another political party at the end of the day, and like the others are just as capable of promising all sorts of wondrous things that may (or most likely will never) come to pass.....
Stand clear, doors slicing
#3
(04-Sep-2010, 02:38 PM)EYL Wrote: Let's not forget when all's said & done, the Greens are just another political party at the end of the day, and like the others are just as capable of promising all sorts of wondrous things that may (or most likely will never) come to pass.....
You need not worry, help is at hand, Bob will sorts them out.Wink
[Image: bike-1.gif]
#4
and how are they going to power this new high speed rail line.

Not allowed to use coal, not allowed to use oil, not allowed to use nuclear. The Greens have no idea. The next 4 years are going to see Australia go backwards.
You won't get me I'm part of the Union, you won't get me I'm part of the Union, till the day I die, till the day I die.<br /><br />The Strawbs. 1973 Bursting at the Seams:<br />Part of the Union.
#5
(05-Sep-2010, 06:30 PM)Nevyn Wrote: and how are they going to power this new high speed rail line.

Not allowed to use coal, not allowed to use oil, not allowed to use nuclear.....
No prob there - Brown Bob will either fart in a jar or talk into it - allowing no noxiarse gases to pervade the environment, of course :whatever
Stand clear, doors slicing
#6
They'd get a couple of years of cheap electricity from burning all the reports and studies already produced for this project.
Nickel Plate High Speed Service
#7
The other issue of how to power it is what power to use.

Both Melbourne and Sydney run on 1500v DC, and I doubt they would build that many substations. 25kV AC is the obvious choice, but then there would be complaints it is not compatible with current systems, so an entirely new railway would have to be built, adding massive costs to the project. The blow outs would be astronomical for the project, and simply end up in the too hard basket.

Of course the easy solution is to fund both Melbourne and Sydney changing over to 25kV AC, but this would mean an upgrade to current rolling stock and infrastructure, which would just be seen as more money being spent in the big cities, and less money for the bush where it is needed.

Then we have to go back to the 1970's when the Fraser government offered to put up the clothesline between Melbourne and Sydney, but were told it was impossible, because the two cities run on different electricity cycles (one up, when the other is down), so it would cause trains to blow up!

Believe me, if it happened, I would be jumping at the chance to drive it, but they can find too many ways to make it all seem so hard, and the gullible will eat it up. What next? We can't build it because Australia is too flat, and the passengers will miss out on stunning European style views as they speed along.
&quot;How long will the next train be? Six cars would be my guess.&quot;
#8
(06-Sep-2010, 09:52 AM)Chicken Fish Wrote: Australia is too flat, and the passengers will miss out on stunning European style views as they speed along.

Fawlty Towers Wrote:BASIL: That is Torquay, Madam.
MRS RICHARDS: Well, it not good enough.
BASIL : Well...may I ask what you were hoping to see out of a Torquay hotel bedroom window? Sydney Opera House Perhaps? The Hanging Gardens of Babylon? Herds of wildebeests sweeping majestically....
Graham R - Dalby Qld
Any opinions expressed here are my own and not those of any group or organisation I am associated with.
Member Southern Downs Steam Railway | ARHS Qld
#9
(06-Sep-2010, 09:52 AM)Chicken Fish Wrote: The other issue of how to power it is what power to use.

Both Melbourne and Sydney run on 1500v DC, and I doubt they would build that many substations. 25kV AC is the obvious choice, but then there would be complaints it is not compatible with current systems, so an entirely new railway would have to be built, adding massive costs to the project. The blow outs would be astronomical for the project, and simply end up in the too hard basket.
If you want to build a fast train service between capitals, it will need to be separate from the existing network to compete with aeroplane times. A train that gets to Campbelltown several minutes after the aeroplane which took off from Domestic at the same time arrives in Melbourne is not going to draw many people away from flying.

I do get the idea that the plan initially floated by the Greens is Regional Fast Rail for New South Wales plus extensions of the two inter-urban lines to capital cities. Even so, they'd want at least amplification of the existing suburban tracks to achieve targets like one hour to Newcastle.
#10
For a route out of Melbourne, I could see it having to be a bloody long tunnel to begin with. All the Nimby's will not want high speed trains going though their back yards, where little Johnny Snotsleeves might have climbed over the electric barb wired fence to get his $10 footy back.

So what route to take?

Well If it left from Spencer Street (Southern Cross), it could follow the current SG route out of the station, to South Dynon, where it could then go underground. Not sure where to bring it back to the surface, but I would suggest a stop at Melbourne Airport would be a bloody good idea. This would allow it to connect with other flights, and if there is no flights, it's an easy way to get people out of the airport and on to an alternative rather quickly. This service would not be a replacement for the local airport services that should be running, if it wasn't for the Jeffed contract that was signed for City Link.
After the airport, it could pretty much follow the current line to Albury, where I would have another stop.

From there, I'll let the New South Welshmen work out the best route, but I am guessing to would have to go via Canberra. If there are any other stops along the way, I really don't know. Realistically, the trip from Spencer Street to Central Station shouldn't take more than around 3-3.5 hours for it to be competitive with the times it takes to get to the airport, check in, fly, and get into the destination city.
&quot;How long will the next train be? Six cars would be my guess.&quot;


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