Parcel Van 3779
#1
At Mortdale.
No idea if she has survived or not.


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&quot;I think people should be free to engage in any sexual practices they choose; they should draw the line at goats though.&quot; <br />Elton John
All the filthy Aussie Rail info at http://locoshed.blogspot.com
Check out the Philippine Railway Historical Society. http://philippine-railways.blogspot.com
#2
Was it a driveable Parcel Van as I see a windscreen wiper on the end window, some history on how they were used would be good thanks. Smile
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#3
Looks like a stand-alone unit with a panto, so electric powered. I believe there may have been diesel powered units as well?

Edit: A search turned up these:

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P1 St Marys Feb 1981 by chrisadowns, on Flickr

P1 is arriving at St Marys at the end of its second run to Ropes Creek. P1's consist is two parcels vans plus two passenger cars.

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1966, Bankstown Parcels Station by opsbooks, on Flickr

1966, Parcels Office, Bankstown Station, NSW, Australia, Fast Electric Parcels Van, so-called!
Graham R - Dalby Qld
Any opinions expressed here are my own and not those of any group or organisation I am associated with.
Member Southern Downs Steam Railway | ARHS Qld
#4
Yes Coyote, they were typically driving motors retired from pax service and modified for parcels duties. You could 'post' a parcel at a suburban railway station (Melbourne and Sydney at least) and these beast would do the rounds of the network picking up and delivering - probably during the silent hours I'd imagine. Was easier 'back then' as stations were staffed by SM's porters and clerks to handle such business.
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#5
Hi guys,
Don't know a huge amount about them. Somewhere I have a working timetable that included there services in the later years.
While they may have run late at night, I don't believe they were restricted to it as I saw them going about their business during the day as well.
Am unaware of any diesel variant. All rural parcels likely were accomodated on normal train services (mail vans, guards compartments etc). Probably wasn't enough to warrant specialised rural parcel vans.

IIRC in either the later days as parcel vans, or immediately aftr it finished, they were utilized as recovery trains (also appearing in working timetables. In this duty they would ply the system recovering items owned by the railways, including spark seats chucked through windows by the vermin of the day.
&quot;I think people should be free to engage in any sexual practices they choose; they should draw the line at goats though.&quot; <br />Elton John
All the filthy Aussie Rail info at http://locoshed.blogspot.com
Check out the Philippine Railway Historical Society. http://philippine-railways.blogspot.com
#6
P1

Had forgotten about this train. Was a regular Ropes Creek line operation and I am pretty sure it was unique to there (unless it ran to one of the other interesting industrial lines of the time).
Always wanted to ride, but as a youngun I was a bit worried about all the talk of getting in trouble at Ropes Creek.
&quot;I think people should be free to engage in any sexual practices they choose; they should draw the line at goats though.&quot; <br />Elton John
All the filthy Aussie Rail info at http://locoshed.blogspot.com
Check out the Philippine Railway Historical Society. http://philippine-railways.blogspot.com
#7
Interesting photos, I was aware the Melbourne electric system had dedicated parcel/freight electric "vans" but not Sydney...Confusedmiley

As far as a "diesel variant" I would rate the fleet of CPH rail motors as fulfilling part of this role. There is of course a sizable "freight" compartment in the centre of the CPH behind the sliding doors (ie above the engine).

The CPH's of course can & often did run in multiple formation around Sydney, indeed N..S..W - Newcastle, Sydney, Wollongong on the sparser parts of the 'metropolitan' network where a 'full' train - be it electric or loco hauled was not justified.
#8
Quote:There is of course a sizable "freight" compartment in the centre of the CPH behind the sliding doors (ie above the engine).
Didn't some of the 2ooo class Queensland railmotors have a parcel area too? Smile
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#9
(08-Jul-2011, 10:01 PM)Coyote Wrote: Didn't some of the 2ooo class Queensland railmotors have a parcel area too? Smile

Yep, all the odd numbered ones, but I suspect you knew that... Smile
Graham R - Dalby Qld
Any opinions expressed here are my own and not those of any group or organisation I am associated with.
Member Southern Downs Steam Railway | ARHS Qld
#10
(08-Jul-2011, 10:27 PM)Graham4405 Wrote:
(08-Jul-2011, 10:01 PM)Coyote Wrote: Didn't some of the 2ooo class Queensland railmotors have a parcel area too? Smile

Yep, all the odd numbered ones, but I suspect you knew that... Smile
Yes, I know 2053 well, i was thinking along the lines of a compartment only excessable from the wayside(the ground). Smile

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