V.R.Diesel question(historical,now!)
#1
Back in the 1960`s I lived in Melbourne & worked for Ansett-A.N.A.
A good friend of mine,the late Norm De Pomeroy a legendary driver,occasionally took me with him to South Dynon Loco Depot where there were dozens & dozens of locos stabled.
These locos when not needed for some hours or the whole weekend were all left idling-day & night.
Can someone tell me why they were not ever shut down?
Thanks,Alan.
#2
In those days, fuel was cheaper than replacing dodgy Batteries. May not be the entire reason, but in some remote locations, a loco would be left idling all weekend when there was some risk of a loco failing to start when next required.
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#3
(14-Jul-2013, 11:04 AM)Alan Parker Wrote: Back in the 1960`s I lived in Melbourne & worked for Ansett-A.N.A.
A good friend of mine,the late Norm De Pomeroy a legendary driver,occasionally took me with him to South Dynon Loco Depot where there were dozens & dozens of locos stabled.
These locos when not needed for some hours or the whole weekend were all left idling-day & night.
Can someone tell me why they were not ever shut down?
Thanks,Alan.
#4
No doubt about it,ask an historical question about the V.R. and the answer comes from FNQ !!! Thanks Mick.
#5
(14-Jul-2013, 01:16 PM)Mick Wrote: In those days, fuel was cheaper than replacing dodgy Batteries. May not be the entire reason, but in some remote locations, a loco would be left idling all weekend when there was some risk of a loco failing to start when next required.

It also had to do with eliminating serious faults that can develop when starting a "cold" engine.

Quote from http://railway-technical.blogspot.com.au...esels.html

"A common reason for keeping a diesel locomotive idling is cold weather. If the air temperature falls below 40 deg F, the engine will begin to freeze, so they have to be kept running to keep them warm."
#6
(15-Jul-2013, 12:33 PM)BR30453 Wrote:
(14-Jul-2013, 01:16 PM)Mick Wrote: In those days, fuel was cheaper than replacing dodgy Batteries. May not be the entire reason, but in some remote locations, a loco would be left idling all weekend when there was some risk of a loco failing to start when next required.

It also had to do with eliminating serious faults that can develop when starting a "cold" engine.

Quote from http://railway-technical.blogspot.com.au...esels.html

"A common reason for keeping a diesel locomotive idling is cold weather. If the air temperature falls below 40 deg F, the engine will begin to freeze, so they have to be kept running to keep them warm."
Having lived in Lithgow for a number of years I have witnessed this practice as well. It was nothing unusual to drive past the Loco Depot on any given day and see a number of locos idling away around the yard and on the turntable roads.
The reasoning quoted above is true, and I was was always lead to believe that if the units were cycled too often (allowed to cool down and heat up repeatedly) then problems developed with leaks in the cooling and lubrication systems. It was better to let them idle, stay warm and reduce the problems with defects booked due to leaks.
On many a cold Lithgow night, an acrid haze of diesel fumes would engulf the area around the depot. One could only imagine what it was like back in the days of steam with any number of locomotives emitting copious quantities of smoke as they awaited their allotted shift.
#7
Quote:One could only imagine what it was like back in the days of steam with any number of locomotives emitting copious quantities of smoke as they awaited their allotted shif

I would think there would not be much at all, with the loco's banked for the night untill their next shift, if there is no blower or any draft then there should be little smoke. That's the way I look at it. :-",
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#8
(15-Jul-2013, 07:06 PM)Coyote Wrote:
Quote:One could only imagine what it was like back in the days of steam with any number of locomotives emitting copious quantities of smoke as they awaited their allotted shif

I would think there would not be much at all, with the loco's banked for the night untill their next shift, if there is no blower or any draft then there should be little smoke. That's the way I look at it. :-",
You obviously haven't been to Lithgow in winter....... event he smoke from household coal fired heating used to leave a pungent layer of smoke through the valley. Fortunately now that problem has been dramatically reduced due to the uptake of Natural gas for domestic heating
#9
(15-Jul-2013, 07:06 PM)Coyote Wrote:
Quote:One could only imagine what it was like back in the days of steam with any number of locomotives emitting copious quantities of smoke as they awaited their allotted shif

I would think there would not be much at all, with the loco's banked for the night untill their next shift, if there is no blower or any draft then there should be little smoke. That's the way I look at it. :-",

There was always smoke around a depot to a greater or lesser extent when engines were in steam. Remember that even banked fires need occasional attention and some of those would be being stirred into life to raise steam for their next job. In warm weather is was not so bad as the smoke would disperse but cold weather was a different matter and you didn't have to go to Lithgow for that.

Go back 40 - 45 years ago, the Courier Mail used to delight at berating the railway about the smog around Mayne particularly in winter.
#10
Quote:You obviously haven't been to Lithgow in winter.......

Damm right there, anywhere south of Townsville is too cold for me and Lithgow is a long way south. Smile :beer2
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